PABLO HELGUERA: THE FABLE IS TO BE RETOLD

AUGUST 10, 2016 by jenn

Conceptual artist Pablo Helguera combines performance, visual art, community outreach and political activism to examine the social and cultural function of conventional teaching and memory systems. For his exhibition at DiverseWorks, Helguera uses fables to examine forms of visual and linguistic communication (or miscommunication) and understanding — particularly between children and adults and the empowered vs. the marginalized. New installation and video work, as well as a conceptual sculpture and a series of collages titled, Arlington Heights, are included in his first solo exhibition in Houston.

About the Artist

Pablo Helguera (b. 1971, Mexico City, Mexico) is a New York-based interdisciplinary artist, author, and educator with an interest in socially engaged art and performance. Helguera’s work focuses on a variety of topics ranging from history, pedagogy, sociolinguistics, ethnography, memory, and the absurd, and is presented in unexpected and innovative formats. Helguera has exhibited and performed at the Museo de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid; RCA London; 8th Havana Biennial; PERFORMA 05, New York City; MoMA P.S.1; and Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum; and is a recipient of the Guggenheim and Franklin Furnace Fellowships and the Creative Capital and Art Matters grants. He is currently the Director of Adult and Academic Programs at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Helguera is represented by Kent Fine Art, New York and Galeria Enrique Guerrero, Mexico City.

THE FABLE OF THE ANCIENT CHILDREN AND OTHER STORIES: A PERFORMANCE RECITAL WITH PABLO HELGUERA

AUGUST 2, 2016 by jenn

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Pablo Helguera: The Fable Is to Be Retold, this live performance event features Helguera and Houston-area musicians and dancers and is inspired by childhood fables and fairytales. The recital includes adaptations of the story of “The Mock Turtle” from Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865), “The Swan” from Camille Saint-Saëns’s Carnival of the Animals (1886), and Scott Joplin’s Solace (Mexican Serenade) (1909). Performing artists include Yvonne Chen (piano), Harrison Guy (dance), Tomas Jonsson (piano), Candace Rattliff (dance), Yvonne Smith (viola), and Nicholas Wong (cello).

About the Artist

Pablo Helguera (b. 1971, Mexico City, Mexico) is a New York-based interdisciplinary artist, author, and educator with an interest in socially engaged art and performance. Helguera’s work focuses on a variety of topics ranging from history, pedagogy, sociolinguistics, ethnography, memory, and the absurd, and is presented in unexpected and innovative formats. Helguera has exhibited and performed at the Museo de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid; RCA London; 8th Havana Biennial; PERFORMA 05, New York City; MoMA P.S.1; and Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum; and is a recipient of the Guggenheim and Franklin Furnace Fellowships and the Creative Capital and Art Matters grants. He is currently the Director of Adult and Academic Programs at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Helguera is represented by Kent Fine Art, New York and Galeria Enrique Guerrero, Mexico City.

TINY ART SALON AT THE TEXAS CONTEMPORARY

AUGUST 1, 2016 by jenn

DiverseWorks presents Tiny Art Salon, a series of talks and live performances by Houston-area artists in the DW booth at the 2016 Texas Contemporary art fair. Tiny Art Salon proposes an alternative to the standard art fair booth by providing a platform for artists to present short talks, host conversations, and perform unique works over the course of the four-day fair.

Schedule of Events

Friday, Sept 30, 3 – 4 pm
John Pluecker
Reading from his new book of poetry and images, Ford Over, Pluecker will reveal the interconnected layers of history, narrative, images, and archives. Ford Over is cut up and aggregate and mashup: made of language drawn from the multilingual chronicles of colonial agents who traveled through the land now known as the state of Texas. At the heart of the book is the mystery of the physical act of crossing a river; perhaps the person crossing is Juan Luis (Jean Louis) Berlandier, a Franco-Mexican botanist who traveled through Northern Mexico drawing maps, writing and collecting plants as part of the 1826 Comisión de los Limites. Or perhaps it is someone else. Perhaps it is you. Or me. Or them. Or us still trapped in the crossing of that same river.

Pluecker is a writer, interpreter, translator, and co-founder of Antena, the language justice and literary experimentation collaborative.

Saturday, October 1, 11:30 am – 12:30 pm
Emily Peacock: Mini Talk Show
Using the format of a late-night talk show, Peacock will conduct interviews with fellow lens-based artists, including Teresa Munisteri, Prince Thomas, Jean-Sebastien Boncy, Britt Thomas, and Drew Bacon.

Saturday, October 1, 1 – 2 pm
ROUX (Rabéa Ballin, Delita Pinchback-Martin, Ann Sole Sister Johnson, and Lovie Olivia): #AskRoux

Taking questions submitted from various social media platforms, ROUX (a collective of  Rabéa Ballin, Delita Pinchback-Martin, Ann Sole Sister Johnson, and Lovie Olivia) will have a conversation about the medium of printmaking, live and online through storytelling. In the interest of honoring their ancestors, this collective presents ideas that bend, stir, mix, and alter aspects of the African American legacy.

Saturday, October 1, 2:30 – 3:30 pm
JooYoung Choi: Photo Time with Queen Kiok and the Snow People
Choi has created a collaborative, interactive project with a unique set of Snow People puppets that will be available to interact with at the Texas Contemporary. Come get your photo with a Snow Person!

Saturday, October 1, 5 – 6:30 pm
Lina Dib, Tony Day, Adrienne Simoes Correa, and Maureen Haver:
Meet the Future – Fossilized in Houston Drawing Party
Join Fossilized in Houston and bear witness to the anthropocene. Make your own mark at a drawing party while listening to a sound environment of technological and biological extinction. Pick up free Fossilized in Houston stickers and posters, created by 17 Houston-area artists, and help spread the word!
Sunday, October 2, 1 – 2:30 pm

Abinadi Meza: Pentagramophone, 5 Lines Drawn in Air (or Prismatic Music)
Meza will conduct a live radio broadcast for five listeners wearing noise-blocking FM headset receivers. The performance is inspired by Antonin Artaud’s “50 Drawings to Murder Magic” and engages Artaud’s understanding of magic as a form of “constant communication,” and as a link to rejoin things and words, the poetic and the plastic. Using a live microphone and electronic processing, common and uncommon objects are “opened” as prismatic sonic material. The pathways between transmitter and 5 listeners draw and redraw invisible lines forming a charged electromagnetic shape in architectural and social space.

Click here for more information about the Texas Contemporary Art Fair 2016.

Tiny Art Salon is made possible by an Arts Respond Project grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts.

SHEILA PEPE invites SONDRA PERRY — Put me down Gently: A Cooler Place + I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That

JUNE 1, 2016 by jenn

Sheila Pepe’s exhibition at DiverseWorks is a commissioned installation that serves as an open meeting space and platform for several events, including a video installation by current MFAH Core Fellow Sondra Perry. With an interest in carving out space within solo exhibitions for young artists, Pepe invited Perry, working in video and performance, to respond to her augmented reinstallation of Put me down Gently, 2015. Each artist worked autonomously, yet their projects were hinged by shared resources, the color blue and an investment in improvisation within institutional frameworks. The exhibition evolved and two installations emerged – tethered to each other by ongoing conversations on craft, class, race, place and screens of projection.

Since the mid-1990s, Pepe has used feminist and craft traditions to investigate received notions of canonical artwork, as well as the artist’s relationship to museum display. For this exhibition, Pepe invites artists and participants to perform, explore, and discuss issues related to race and LGBTQ identity through a series of events that will take place within her installation. In addition, a live performance by Perry is scheduled for Friday, June 17 at 7pm in the DiverseWorks gallery at the MATCH, and Pepe’s first ever staged performance takes place on Saturday, June 18 at 3pm in Matchbox 1, to be followed by a community discussion.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Individuals and small groups are also welcome to use the space during gallery hours. Do you have a group that would like to meet within Sheila Pepe’s installation? Please contact Reyes Ramirez at reyes@diverseworks.org to schedule a day and time.

ABOUT SHEILA PEPE

Sheila Pepe (b. 1959, Morristown, NJ) has exhibited widely throughout the United States and abroad in solo and group exhibitions as well as collaborative projects. Venues for Pepe’s many solo exhibitions include the Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts and the Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, North Carolina. Her work has been included in important group exhibitions such as the first Greater New York at PS1/MoMA; Hand + Made: The Performative Impulse in Art & Craft, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, TX; and Artisterium, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. Pepe’s work was recently featured in the exhibition, Queer Threads, at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art in New York. Recent commissions include work for the 8th Shenzhen Sculpture Biennale and the ICA/Boston’s traveling exhibition, Fiber: Sculpture 1960-present.

Pepe is also known as an educator who likes to trespass the boundaries of fixed disciplines in art and design. She has taught since 1995—for many years as adjunct faculty in a variety of programs and schools including Brandeis University, Bard College, RISD, VCU, and Williams College—until 2006, when she took a full-time position at Pratt Institute as the Assistant Chair of Fine Arts. Her own artistic development was a mix of academic training and non-degree granting residencies: BFA, Massachusetts College of Art, 1983; Haystack School, 1984; Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, 1994; MFA, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1995; and Radcliffe Institute, 1998–99. Pepe was a resident faculty member at Skowhegan School in 2013. Spring 2016 appointments include Core Critic in Painting + Printmaking at Yale University and Resident Artist at SUNY Purchase, NY.

ABOUT SONDRA PERRY

Sondra Perry (born 1986 in Perth Amboy, New Jersey) is an interdisciplinary artist whose works in video, installation, computer-based media, and performance explore black stuff and the digital abstraction of subjecthood. In 2015, the artist’s work appeared in the fourth iteration of Greater New York at MoMA/PS1. Other exhibitions include Disguise: Masks and Global African Art, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle (2015) and Brooklyn Museum (2016); A Constellation, Studio Museum in Harlem (2016); and the 2016 Core Exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. She has participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Vermont Studio Center, Ox-Bow, and the Experimental Television Center. Perry holds an MFA from Columbia University, New York City’s 12th largest employer and the number one cause of gentrification in the neighborhood of Harlem, New York, a BFA from Alfred University, and is currently based in Houston as part of the Core artist-in-residence program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

A PARTY WITH NO AGENDA

JUNE 1, 2016 by jenn

A PERFORMANCE BY SONDRA PERRY

In episode 17, Season 27 of The Simpsons, after Mr. Burns’s continued refusal to acknowledge the hard work and affection of Smithers, his right-hand man, Homer throws a party inviting the gay men of Springfield in hopes of finding Smithers a boyfriend. A banner welcoming the guests reads ‘A Party With No Agenda.’ In this directly indirect wink and a nudge of a performance, Perry and the audience will work through how ideology, didacticism, and abstraction are visualized through bodies and popular culture.

A Party With No Agenda is presented in conjunction with the exhibition SHEILA PEPE invites SONDRA PERRY – Put me down Gently: A Cooler Place + I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That. The exhibition is a commissioned installation by Sheila Pepe that serves as an open meeting space and platform for several events, including a video installation by MFAH Core Fellow Sondra Perry. With an interest in carving out space within solo exhibitions for young artists, Pepe invited Perry, working in video and performance, to respond to her augmented reinstallation of Put me down Gently, 2015. Each artist worked autonomously, yet their projects were hinged by shared resources, the color blue and an investment in improvisation within institutional frameworks. The exhibition evolved and two installations emerged – tethered to each other by ongoing conversations on craft, class, race, place and screens of projection.

Sondra Perry (born 1986 in Perth Amboy, New Jersey) is an interdisciplinary artist whose works in video, installation, computer-based media, and performance explores black stuff and the digital abstraction of subjecthood. In 2015, the artist’s work appeared in the fourth iteration of Greater New York at MoMA/PS1. Other exhibitions include Disguise: Masks and Global African Art, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle (2015) and Brooklyn Museum (2016); A Constellation, Studio Museum in Harlem (2016); and the 2016 Core Exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. She has participated in residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Vermont Studio Center, Ox-bow, and the Experimental Television Center. Perry holds an MFA from Columbia University, New York City’s 12th largest employer and the number one cause of gentrification in the neighborhood of Harlem, New York; a BFA from Alfred University; and is currently based in Houston, Texas as part of the Core artist-in-residence program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.